ClassicPontiacs.com

Classic Pontiacs Re-Sale Value Guidelines

 

http://ClassicPontiacs.com/values/index.html


In an effort to provide some Guidelines to help you when you're trying to determine the current values of your Classics, we're charting the details (including the date of Sale or Purchase) of Buy/Sell Transactions submitted by our Members and Visitors.

When you view the Chart, you need to take note of the Transaction DATE.
If it's too old, the info. may not be applicable to a current sale or purchase.

Please do not ask us to provide a Value for your Classic !
We have no appraiser on staff.

Click to View Classic Pontiac Resale Values Guidelines Chart

Click To View Classic Pontiacs Values Showcase

What's It Worth?

I am asking the secondary owners of Pontiac Classics to tell me what you paid for your Pontiac. Tell me the year, model, body style (convertible, hardtop, sedan, 2dr or 4dr, etc.), mileage, options and condition when you bought her.

Also, it would be interesting to know what state you are located in if you are in the USA, as different parts of the country sometimes seem to get higher prices for vehicles than other areas do.

Our goal is to compile an aggregate tool which may be helpful to all of us in determining approximate resale values on our Classics. I think this could be a very valuable resource for buyers and sellers alike!

Transactions submitted without the Transaction Price
will NOT be posted.
Click To Send Your Information

What Makes It A Classic?

It's more than supply and demand.

Is it the age of the car? 10, 15, 20, 30 years old? Must it still have all the original parts? If restored, must all replaced parts be numbers matching? Must color be original factory paint color? ? ? ?

It's a matter of perspective. There are some older guys in the hobby who think that anything made after 1969 isn't a Classic.

Of course, there are a few even older guys still out there who would say that anything built after 1959 isn't a Classic.

If you were looking to buy one today, what would you look for?

Click To E-mail Your Comments

In an effort to provide some Guidelines to help you when you're trying to determine the current values of your Classics, we're charting the details (including the date of Sale or Purchase) of Buy/Sell Transactions submitted by our Members and Visitors.

When you view the Chart, you need to take note of the Transaction DATE.
If it's too old, the info. may not be applicable to a current sale or purchase.

Please do not ask us to provide a Value for your Classic !
We have no appraiser on staff.

Click to View Classic Pontiac Resale Values Guidelines Chart

Click To View Classic Pontiacs Values Showcase

 

What Makes It A Classic?

From: Chuck
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Friday, November 27, 2009

“I guess what makes a car classic, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. I was born in 1960, so in 1971, I was 11 when GM rolled out the first year of the big body cars ... I learned to drive in our family's 9 passenger 1972 Catalina wagon. It was a typical everyday American car for groceries, little league, and wherever mom had to go. We took a few family trips in that car, and when my older brothers went off to college, I drove them there while I was still a high schooler.

I think what makes the 71–76 big bodies so classic is that they were the first cars to hit the road built to cruise the interstate highway system. Big honkin' V8 engines, and radial tires, better suspension, left Ford and Chrysler in the right lane. Sure, other kids were tooling up and down their local version of Woodward Ave, doing quarter miles, but they had to stop at the next red light. Whoopee, We were hauling butt down the interstate humming along at a smooth 90 mph with 7 people in the car, all who had lots of room!

Of all the big GM's, Pontiac had the edge in style. Grilles, hoods, body creases were just clean. Oddly, I prefer the 9 passenger wagon. I love the curved back windows, the clamshell tailgate and the pointed tail lights. The square headlights make the 75 and 76 the prettiest of the 6 year run, but all the grilles are cool. 72 is very Rolls Royce in appearance.

Advice to anyone lucky enough to own one, if you plan to repaint or restore, the wagons look better without the wood grain. The paneling busts up the sleek line that runs from the top of the fender in to the front door, then out the back door to the top of the tail light. I hope some day I can own one of these beasts.”


From: Thom
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Thursday, July 31, 2008

“The age of the car first of all and the number of cars still on the road. That is why I love my Grandville.”


From: Scott
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Saturday, June 3, 2006

“I am a 3rd generation car collector. My maternal grandfather was Leonard A. Davis of Waterford, Michigan. He was the first restorer/collector of vintage cars specifically recognized by thr Henry Ford Musuem/Greenfield Village as one of the first and most respected restoration artists in the arena. Learning from him, I feel that relying on the original standards, set down by the earliest collector organizations, seems a most appropriate practice. Like the Constitution of our government, this gives a recognized basis which can be amended to incorporate changes in the cars being collected. Allowing board concensus approval on topics such as adding a specific car to the CCCA standard of ‘classic’ should enable worthy makes as 1957 El Dorado Brougham, Dual-Ghia, Ghia Imperial, etc. to the accepted classic roster by the criteria of limited edition, quality, exclusivity, hand-built luxury cars. In my opinion these and more are well worthy of Classic Car Club of America accepted status. The term Classic should be reserved for CCCA accepted cars. 25 years of age is an acceptable period for judging status. I get weak seeing Montana vans being judged and awarded trophies at Pontiac events.

As far as restoration standards, the early brass car enthusiasts valued originality and preservation above all else. Safety modifications were often made (along with a few comfort additions on cars used for touring). Driving the Brass Era cars was the second most important aspect to my grandfather. The cars were not completely enjoyed nor appreciated if they were never used for all day outings for family events, only afforded by the more privileged classes. Gas and Brass or Glidden Tour events, Fall Color Tours and the Detroit to Lansing runs were among the most interesting events. Following these standards for originality, appropriate equipment in factory colors and materials, allow acceptable alterations but preferably only when a car requires the restoration or repair. Appreciation of patinated stock vehicles was the priority. I am afraid, as grandpa had expressed, that in a few years no one will know what a correct original Willys or Zepher really looked like from the factory.”


From: Bruce
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Monday, May 1, 2006

“I would consider cars that had very low production numbers as well as special or interesting body types such as convertibles will eventually become classics. GM cars built after 1976 will most likely not fall into that group.”


From: Larry
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Saturday, March 18, 2006

“I personally think that a ‘classic’ is a car that inspires favorable comments from onlookers. For example, my 74 Grand Safari wagon with 455, crane hi-intensity 305 deg. cam and dual three inch exhaust with 14" turbo mufflers, 15"x7" ralley-2 wheels fitted with 31x10.50x15 white outline letter light truck tires is a ‘mean looking and sounding machine’. I call this one ‘Thunder Wagon’ for obvious reasons. My wife was idling through town one day, and the lady who owned the drive up movie rental store came running out and asked her to hurry into the parking lot and shut down her engine as the exhaust sound was vibrating movie tapes off the shelves. Thunder Wagon has been clocked by the Oregon state patrol at 128 MPH! Considering that we are talking about a car that weighs 6000 pounds and is about as aerodynamic as a brick, I was proud to pay the ticket.

Both of my GSW's have 455's, light blue metallic paint, wood grain side panels, and disappearing tailgates. Other options include: power steering, windows, disc brakes, seats, door locks, ac, and four speaker 8-track stereos.

What's it worth? My first 74 GSW cost $1295.00 in 1978. It's NOT for sale! My second 74 GSW cost $450.00 in 1996, it's my wife's car and I don't think she would sell it for 10 times that. Well, I could talk for hours about my Pontiacs [all 10 of them] but I suppose I should end this session, but it might be useful to note that for four years I was the only PMD certified Mr. Goodwrench in the city of The Dalles, Oregon.
I have been a Pontiac owner and mechanic since 1963. I'll close with a list of the Pontiacs that I have owned.
57 Star Chief 2dht
58 Chieftain 2d post
58 Chieftain 2d post
58 Chieftain 4dht
63 Bonneville 4dht
64 Catalina 2+2
64 Bonneville Safari 4dsw
74 Grand Safari 4dsw
74 Grand Safari 4dsw
78 Trans Am WS6 T/A 6.6
Well folks, that's the list. As far as I'm concerned, they are all classics and deserving of admiration and esteem. I'd be honored to answer any questions or just talk about Pontiacs.”


From: Perry
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Sunday, November 11, 2007
“Need to know what a 1971 T37 4-Door Pontiac is worth in running condition.”


From: Igor
Subject: Classic Values Comments
Date: Sunday, March 12, 2006

“I have a 1973 Catalina all original parts, 96,000 original miles, no dents; just lil bad paint here and there. What do you think it would go for?”


 

Please do not ask us to provide a Value for your Classic !
We have no appraiser on staff.

Click to View Classic Pontiac Resale Values Guidelines Chart

Click To View Classic Pontiacs Values Showcase

ClassicPontiacs.com/values/index.html

 


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